History in This Spot

Sunday, January 14th at 2PM is your next opportunity for Discovering and Sharing Pine City History with the Pine City Area History Association.

Individuals interested in the study and preservation of local history are encouraged to attend the next meeting of the PCAHA.  The meeting will be held at 2PM in the Pine City Public Library meeting room on Sunday, January 14th.

The main focus for this quarterly session will be a review of the projects completed in 2017 as part of the “History in This Spot” series.  Topics may include addresses in Block 19, the Jonas Gray and Emil Hoefler homes on 8th Street and Pine City gets Electric Lights.  Audience preference will determine which topics we cover.

For more information on the Pine City History Association, call 320.322.9208 or email pcahistory@gmail.com

Pine City highlighted in new book

The history of Pine City was captured in a new book that recently came out and is available at local and national retailers.  To learn more, click here.

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Times change, so does use of certain material

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We live in a rapidly changing environment.  That was evident in talking to some of Pine City’s senior residents at the event held last week.  New technology enhances the ways in which we live and antiquated ways of doing things go by the wayside.  Such was the case of the Pine City button factory of the 1800’s.  Then, most buttons were made of natural materials such as woods, metals or pearls. 

But Pine City was once home to a small button factory on the south shore of the Snake River that punched holes (referred to then as ‘cutting blanks’) in clam shells to make the buttons.  Pearl hunting has since become an extinct sport in Lake Pokegama and the region.  Over 75% of the clam stock of the lake was depleted in just a two-year period.  Even if the lake had been restocked, the future of the Pine City button factory would have been in limbo.  It’s likely that today’s more cost-effective buttons (glass, plastic and other hybrids) would have taken over as the types used as fasteners and for decoration.